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Top CTP questions answered


There’s a lot of confusion around Compulsory Third Party (CTP) insurance.

CTP insurance is a type of accident compensation that pays compensation to people who have been injured physically or psychologically in a car accident.

A common misconception is that CTP covers damage to cars and property when in fact, it doesn’t.

Here’s more answers to the top questions about CTP. 

What is covered by CTP?

Compulsory Third Party (CTP) covers claims made against you if you or anyone else driving your car has an accident and someone is injured or if they die. CTP doesn’t cover the cost of damage to anyone else’s car or property, or your car. For that you’ll need car insurance.

Here are some example scenarios where CTP covers you:

  • If you cause an accident and a person is injured or dies

If you’re involved in a car accident while driving, whether it was partially or wholly your fault, your CTP policy covers the compensation costs for the person if they are injured or if they die. Compensation costs involve rehabilitation, treatment, payments to support income or funeral expenses.

  • If you are harmed or if you die in a car accident

If someone else causes an accident on the road and you’re injured or if you die, you, yourself or your next of kin can claim compensation from the CTP insurer that covers the person who caused the accident, known as the ‘at fault’ driver.

  • If an uninsured or anonymous person causes an accident and you die or are injured

In some states in Australia, including NSW and QLD, you or your next of kin can be eligible for compensation if you’re injured or if you die in an accident caused by someone who can’t be identified, for example, in a hit and run, or by a person driving an unregistered vehicle.

Typically, a CTP insurer will be assigned to the case by the CTP scheme regulator and the claim is made through what is called a ‘nominal defendant.’

Is CTP insurance compulsory?

CTP insurance is required by law in all Australian states and territories. All drivers must have CTP insurance before they can register their vehicle.

Find out your other legal obligations as a car owner.

What does New South Wales CTP insurance cover?

CTP insurance in New South Wales is also known as a green slip.

If you were injured psychologically or physically in a car accident that happened before 1 December 2017, you may be eligible for personal injury benefits or a lump-sum compensation if the accident was not your fault. 

If you are the next of kin or the legal representative of someone who was killed in a car accident you may be eligible for compensation for relatives, for example, if you were financially dependent on the deceased relative, or for funeral expenses.

CTP

Does CTP insurance cover me anywhere in Australia?

CTP insurance covers you anywhere you drive in Australia, regardless of the state or territory your vehicle is registered.

If you cause an accident and someone is injured or dies while driving interstate, the person or their next of kin are eligible for compensation from your CTP insurer.

If you cause an accident and you are injured or if you die, your eligibility for compensation depends on if your state has a no-fault or fault-based CTP scheme.

In a fault-based scheme, a driver who was wholly at fault in the accident (or their next of kin) is not eligible for compensation for death or injuries*.

In a no-fault scheme, a driver who caused the accident may be eligible for compensation for their injuries or death*.

Despite this some governments have established various schemes for catastrophic injuries regardless of fault, see individual states for further information. Please refer to your relevant State or Territory authority:

 State or Territory  State Regulator or Administrator
 Australian Capital Territory  https://apps.treasury.act.gov.au/compulsorytpi
 New South Wales  https://www.sira.nsw.gov.au/insurance-coverage/CTP-insurance-Green-Slips
 Northern Territory  http://www.ntmacc.com.au/
 Queensland  https://maic.qld.gov.au/
 South Australia  http://www.ctp.sa.gov.au/
 Tasmania   http://www.maib.tas.gov.au/
 Victoria  http://www.tac.vic.gov.au/about-the-tac/our-organisation/transport-accident-charge
 Western Australia  https://www.icwa.wa.gov.au/
 
 

Does CTP insurance cover vehicle damage?

No, CTP insurance does not cover vehicle damage because CTP insurance is a form of personal injury compensation only. If you want to cover vehicle damage cover, you’ll also need comprehensive insurance or third party insurance.

Does CTP insurance cover the other car?

No, CTP insurance doesn’t cover damage to other people’s vehicles if you’re liable in a car accident. If you want to be covered for damage to other people’s cars, you’ll need comprehensive car insurance or third party car insurance as well as CTP.

Is CTP and green slip the same?

Yes, a ‘green slip’ is what CTP insurance policy is often called in New South Wales. In New South Wales, you have to buy a green slip – or take out a CTP – before you can register a vehicle.

Do you need CTP if you have comprehensive?

Yes, CTP and comprehensive insurance are different forms of cover. CTP insurance is a form of personal injury insurance and is required by law.
Comprehensive insurance covers the costs to repair or replace your car if it’s damaged or stolen as well as the costs of damage to another person’s car or property if you’re liable for an accident.

How do I get a CTP green slip?

Multiple insurers in New South Wales offer CTP. 

You can get an online quote and buy your CTP green slip insurance online with QBE here: https://www.qbe.com/au/green-slip-insurance/nsw

Or you can phone QBE on 133 723 to buy your policy over the phone.

What is the difference between CTP and third party insurance?

Third party car insurance is a separate type of insurance that protects you if you’re at fault in a car accident and damage another person’s car or property.

Other types of car insurance to consider in comparison to third party insurance are third party fire and theft and comprehensive car insurance.

Many people weigh up comprehensive vs third party car insurance.

While these forms of insurance are not required by law like CTP, it’s really important to consider purchasing one of these on top of your CTP cover because if you’re responsible for a road accident, it can be very costly if you don’t have insurance.

Third party fire and theft covers you if you damage another person’s cars, and also to an extent of fire damage to your car, theft, or attempted theft.

Comprehensive car insurance is the broadest level of car insurance cover. It covers any accidental damage to your car or someone else’s property, the contents of your car whether they need to be repaired or replaced, and the theft or attempted theft of your car.

Find out what to do if your car is stolen.

Does CTP cover an at fault driver?

Cover for an at fault driver varies from state to state:

  • In a fault-based scheme, a driver who was wholly at fault in the accident (or their next of kin) is not eligible for compensation for death or injuries*.
  • In a no-fault scheme, a driver who caused the accident may be eligible for compensation for their injuries or death*

Please refer to your relevant State or Territory authority:

 State or Territory  State Regulator or Administrator
 Australian Capital Territory  https://apps.treasury.act.gov.au/compulsorytpi
 New South Wales  https://www.sira.nsw.gov.au/insurance-coverage/CTP-insurance-Green-Slips
 Northern Territory  http://www.ntmacc.com.au/
 Queensland  https://maic.qld.gov.au/
 South Australia  http://www.ctp.sa.gov.au/
 Tasmania   http://www.maib.tas.gov.au/
 Victoria  http://www.tac.vic.gov.au/about-the-tac/our-organisation/transport-accident-charge
 Western Australia  https://www.icwa.wa.gov.au/
 
 *State governments have established various schemes for catastrophic injuries regardless of fault, see individual states for further information.

 

What happens to CTP when you sell a car?

If your car is registered when you sell it, your green slip automatically transfers to the new owner. You’ll receive a refund from your insurer when you hand your plates, when cancelling the registration, into the relevant government body for your state or territory, for example, the Roads & Maritime Services in New South Wales.

Do you pay CTP before rego?

Yes, you need to buy CTP insurance before renewing or getting your vehicle’s registration. If you’re renewing your rego in New South Wales, you need to buy a CTP green slip before your rego’s expiry date.

How do I claim CTP?

Making a CTP claim varies state by state.

Our insurance claims process is quick and easy, you can refer to your state for further information here: https://www.qbe.com/au/claims/ctp

Does CTP cover personal injury?

Yes, CTP is a form of personal injury insurance.

Is CTP included in comprehensive insurance?

No - CTP is a form of personal injury compensations that is required by law. Comprehensive insurance is a separate piece of insurance cover.

If you want coverage for any accidental damage to your car or someone else’s property, the theft or attempted theft of your car, the contents of your car - whether they need to be repaired or replaced - and fire, you will need to buy comprehensive insurance in addition to CTP.

The advice on this website is general in nature and has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. You must decide whether or not it is appropriate, in light of your own circumstances, to act on this advice. You should ensure you obtain and consider the policy wording or Product Disclosure Statement for the policy before you make any decision to buy it.

Interested in QBE CTP insurance?